Mango Daiquiri

Mango Daiquiri

If you enjoy the popular strawberry Daiquiri, consider adding a little pizzaz by whipping up a fresh mango Daiquiri.

All About Mangoes

Using mangoes as a cocktail ingredient has grown in popularity in recent years. For example, you see the mango Margarita and mango Martini. This sweet, tropical fruit is native to South Asia, specifically India and Burma. You can also find mango trees in California, Florida, Mexico and the Philippines.

In the United States, mangoes are in season during the summer months; however, they are often imported from foreign countries and are available year round. When choosing mangoes to make Daiquiris, look for the ripe ones. The skin of a ripe mango gives slightly when touched, and the fruit exudes a sweet scent.

Mango Daiquiri Ingredients

As in most Daiquiris, rum provides the kick to this refreshing cocktail. Along with fresh mangoes, purchase triple sec and limes and make sure you have plenty of ice on hand, preferably crushed. To make one mango Daiquiri, remove the skin from a mango with a sharp paring knife, slice it and remove the seed. Next, chop the fruit into small cubes. Once that's done, squeeze approximately two fresh limes to obtain one-and-a-half tablespoons of juice. Measure out two ounces of rum and half an ounce of triple sec.

To add extra sweetness, whip up a batch of simple syrup. Place equal parts sugar and water in a saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil while stirring briskly. Turn the temperature down to simmer, and remove the pan from the heat when the mixture looks completely clear. You'll only need about ome half ounce of syrup to make a Daiquiri, but you can preserve the rest in the refrigerator for up to a month as long as you store it in an airtight container. Increase the amounts of these ingredients as necessary to make a larger batch of mango Daiquiris.

How to Make a Mango Daiquiri

Once you've assembled and prepared your ingredients, making the Daiquiri is the easy part. Add all the ingredients to your blender and use the pulse function to crush the ice, if needed. Continue to blend the mixture at a high speed until it has a smooth texture. Pour your mango Daiquiri into a glass - either a traditional Daiquiri glass or one intended for Margaritas, Martinis or Highballs will do the trick - and garnish it with a slice of fresh mango.

Variations

Making a mango Daiquiri isn't an exact science. Try these tricks and substitutions to fit your needs:

  • If you don't have access to fresh, ripe mangos, substitute frozen mango chunks or use a specialty mango Daiquiri mix.
  • Use lemon juice as a substitute for lime juice.
  • Instead of squeezing limes, making simple syrup and buying triple sec, just use sweet and sour mix to save some time.
  • Use tequila instead of rum to make a frozen mango Margarita.
  • To make a nonalcoholic version of the drink, add mango or pineapple juice in place of rum.
  • For a fancier cocktail, try Grand Marnier, Cointreau or another high-end orange liqueur in place of triple sec.
  • If you prefer your cocktails straight up, add your ingredients to a shaker and strain them rather than blending.
  • Mangoes and peaches are complementary, so add a few peach slices for a sweet, summery variation on this cocktail.
  • Experiment with using light or dark rum since they have very different flavors.
  • Instead of simple syrup, try using agave nectar.
  • Have fun with your garnishes! Try lime wedges, maraschino cherries or fresh pineapple slices; umbrella optional.

Although they sound exotic, mango Daiquiris are just as easy to make as traditional Daiquiris. Make a pitcher for your next backyard barbeque or a lazy day by the pool.

Mango Daiquiri