Mimosa Drink Recipe

Mimosa in a Champagne flute

Frequently served at brunches and formal breakfasts, Mimosas are popular cocktails made with orange juice and Champagne. Learn how to make the Mimosa correctly if you are planning to serve one of these refreshing cocktails at your next affair or if you just want to try it out at home this weekend.

Basic Mimosa Recipes

The following basic recipe can be adjusted to your drinking preference. Some people prefer their Mimosas made with a half and half ratio. Most Mimosas are served in chilled Champagne flutes and garnished with orange slices.

You can make a Mimosa by the glass or by the pitcher for larger get-togethers. Many people substitute Champagne, which can only be classified as such if it came from that growing region in France, with sparkling wine.

Single Servings

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 4 ounces Champagne
  • 1 orange

Directions

  1. Cut the orange into wedges.
  2. Fill a chilled Champagne flute 2/3 full with chilled orange juice.
  3. Top off the flute with the Champagne.
  4. Stir the mixture with a bar spoon.
  5. Garnish with an orange wedge.

Pitcher

Ingredients

  • 1 bottle of Champagne
  • 1/2 gallon freshly-squeezed orange juice
  • 1 orange

Directions

  1. Cut the orange in half crosswise, and then cut the halves into ¼ thick slices.
  2. Pour the entire bottle of Champagne into the pitcher.
  3. Pour the chilled orange juice into the pitcher.
  4. Stir the mixture thoroughly.
  5. Add all the orange slices to the mixture in the pitcher.

Mimosa Variations

Some people like to experiment with different flavors.

Buck's Fizz

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 4 ounces Champagne
  • 1 teaspoon grenadine
  • 1 orange

Directions

  1. Cut the orange into wedges.
  2. Pour the grenadine into a chilled Champagne flute.
  3. Fill the flute 2/3 full with chilled orange juice.
  4. Top off the flute with the Champagne.
  5. Stir the mixture with a bar spoon.
  6. Garnish with an orange wedge.

Grand Mimosa

Ingredients

  • 1 ounce freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 ounce Grand Marnier liqueur
  • 3 ounces Champagne

Directions

  1. Pour the Grand Marnier into a chilled champagne flute.
  2. Fill the flute half full with Champagne.
  3. Top off the flute with the orange juice.
  4. Stir the mixture with a bar spoon.

Peach Mimosa

Ingredients

  • 1 ounce freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 ounce peach schnapps
  • 3 ounces Champagne

Directions

  1. Pour the peach schnapps into a chilled Champagne flute.
  2. Fill the flute half full with Champagne.
  3. Top off the flute with the orange juice.
  4. Stir the mixture with a bar spoon.

Choosing the Champagne

Choose a Champagne that fits your budget and taste preferences. Most restaurant and bar mimosas are made out of Brut Champagne or sparkling wine, which is dry rather than sweet. Some popular brands of dry champagne or sparkling wine include Moet and Chandon Extra Dry, Cristalino Brut Cava, Korbel Extra Dry, or Freixenet Cordon Negro Brut. If you prefer a sweet sparkling wine in your mimosa, try Martini and Rossi's Asti Spumante.

Mimosa History

The Mimosa was first concocted in the 1920s, though its origins are still debated. Buck's Fizz, a cocktail comprised of orange juice, Champagne and grenadine, was introduced in England in 1921. The name actually came from the club, Buck's Club, that first served the drink. In 1925, the Paris Ritz served the first official Mimosa, made out of Champagne and orange juice only. It was called a Mimosa because the color and consistency of the drink mixture resembled the Mimosa plant flowers. Most Americans and Europeans typically refer to all Champagne and orange juice cocktails as "Mimosas," while the British still call them Buck's Fizz, even though a traditional Buck's Fizz differs slightly from a Mimosa.

Tips for Enjoying Mimosas

Try out different flavors by adding a splash of cranberry or grapefruit juice. Some people garnish their Mimosas with candied cherries, along with the orange slices. You can substitute sparkling cider for children or guests who do not want to drink alcohol. If you don't have enough Champagne flutes to go around, chilled white wine glasses are a fine substitute.

Make your next breakfast get-together more fun by serving this refreshing breakfast cocktail.

Mimosa Drink Recipe